UEFA Annual Report 2021/22
UEFA Annual Report 2021/22

UEFA Annual Report 2021/22

360° view of our impact on and off the pitch
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Governance
UEFA works with the football community to protect and grow the game.

Development
Supporting every level of the football pyramid.

Sustainability
Football drives positive social change beyond the pitch.

Competitions
Every player can dream of playing in our competitions.

reinvesting revenue into european football

net earnings back into
the game

%

70

national associations benefitting from UEFA support

30

for development projects

€1.2bn

COMPETITIONS
Winners of 15 UEFA men’s and women’s finals in 2021/22

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Turin


Winners: Olympique Lyonnais

Women’s Champions League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Belfast

Winners: Chelsea FC

Super Cup 2021

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Nyon


Winners: SL Benfica

Youth League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Tirana


Winners: AS Roma

Europa Conference League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: London


Winners: England

Women’s EURO 2022    

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Trnava


Winners: England

Under-19 EURO

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Riga


Winners: Barça

Futsal Champions League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: London


Winners: Argentina

Finalissima

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Ostrava


Winners: Spain

Women’s Under-19 EURO    

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Porto (Gondomar)

Winners: Spain

Women's Futsal EURO

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Seville


Winners: Eintracht Frankfurt

Europa League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Netanya


Winners: France

Under-17 EURO

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Amsterdam


Winners: Portugal

Futsal EURO 2022

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Paris

Winners: Real Madrid CF

Champions League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Sarajevo


Winners: Germany

Women’s Under-17 EURO

World, Map, Slope

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Porto (Gondomar)

Winners: Spain

Women's Futsal EURO

Champions of Europe 2021/22

Text

Host city: Seville

Winners: Eintracht Frankfurt

Europa League

Text

Host city: Paris

Winners: Real Madrid CF

Champions League

Women's Futsal EURO

Host city: Belfast

Winners: Chelsea FC

Super Cup 2021

Text

Host city: London

Winners: England

Women’s EURO 2022

Text

Host city: London

Winners: Argentina

Finalissima

Text

Host city: Amsterdam

Winners: Portugal

Futsal EURO 2022

Text

Host city: Turin

Winners: Olympique Lyonnais

Women’s Champions League

Text

Host city: Riga

Winners: Barça

Futsal Champions League

Text

Host city: Nyon

Winners: SL Benfica

Youth League

Text

Host city: Ostrava

Winners: Spain

Women’s Under-19 EURO

Text

Host city: Netanya

Winners: France

Under-17 EURO

Text

Host city: Tirana

Winners: AS Roma

Europa Conference League

Text

Host city: Sarajevo

Winners: Germany

Women’s Under-17 EURO

Text

Host city: Tirana

Winners: England

Under-19 EURO

Season highlights

UEFA Annual Report 2021/22

INTRODUction

UEFA Annual Report 2021/22

COMPETITION

every player can dream of playing in our competitionS.

GOVERNANCE

UEFA works with the football community to protect and grow the game.

DEVELOPMENT

97% of our new earnings go back into football.

SUSTAINABILITY

football drives positive social change beyond the pitch.

National associations

45

European clubs

190

for development projects

1.2bn

champions
of
europe
GOVERNANCE
'NEW FINANCIAL REGULATIONS ARE AN IMPORTANT STEP FORWARD'

Q&A with Andrea Traverso, UEFA's financial sustainability and research director

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How do the new regulations relate to financial fair play (FFP)?

They are an evolution of FFP. Regulations have to be constantly adapted and monitored depending on the evolution of the market and the context in which clubs operate. But it's an important evolution, not just a cosmetic one, and an important step forward. On top of fine-tuning existing rules, we have introduced new ones – notably the squad-cost rule.

What would you say to those who feel UEFA has given up on FFP?

We certainly haven’t given up. Firstly, it’s important to recognise that the previous rules had a deep and positive impact. But, of course, they were not perfect, and it’s a natural process to adapt and improve the existing regulations. As European football’s governing body, UEFA has the duty toensure financial stability, and we will continue to do our best to enforce these new rules. It’s important to underline that they have received unanimous support across the European football community. Getting approval from so many stakeholders is a major achievement. UEFA has not drafted the rules on its own; we have done it together and in agreement with all our stakeholders.

What were the challenges of getting the whole football community behind these new rules?

It’s been a long process. A difficult one, but this is normal, because not everyone has the same interests and faces the same issues. We consistently sought to share all information, meet stakeholders regularly, listen to comments and take on feedback. With an inclusive, democratic and transparent process, you can overcome any challenges.

How are you working with clubs, national associations and leagues to aid a smooth transition?

The continuation of dialogue is key. As soon as the regulations were approved, we started to communicate bilaterally. We also organised workshops and educational forums, alongside the creation of toolkits and guidelines. We meet with clubs and associations, and we cooperate with umbrella bodies to organise joint workshops. There is an education plan in progress.

As for the rules themselves, they don’t all come into force at once but through a staggered approach. This will allow all parties to get used to them and implement them correctly.

To what extent will the regulations future-proof the long-term success of European club football?

This is our main goal. Society is only just coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic, and many clubs find themselves in turbulent waters. Guiding them towards a sustainable path will be challenging, possibly more challenging than it’s ever been.

You can have the best regulations, but if they are not enforced, and if people are not committed to them, you won’t achieve the results you want. That’s why it’s crucial that we’ve had buy-in from the beginning. We have the full support of our stakeholders, and European institutions as well.


What's the significance of having separate regulations for the women’s game?

It’s an important step forward. Women's football has developed a lot recently, and very quickly. Some criteria existed in the former club licensing regulations, but the time has come for women's football to have its own set of rules. This will provide the right regulatory framework for development. Indeed, I expect club licensing to act as an accelerator for raising standards in women’s football.

For example, higher standards of youth education, better accessibility to quality infrastructure, higher levels of coaching diplomas and increased professionalism in managing women’s football clubs are all very important elements that will push the women’s game forward and where club licensing can play an important role and make a significant contribution.

Safeguarding football's future

How we deliver across the game

Sports uniform, Human body, Shin guard, Jersey, Soccer, Player, Gesture, Sportswear
'NEW FINANCIAL REGULATIONS ARE AN IMPORTANT STEP FORWARD'

Q&A with Andrea Traverso, UEFA's financial sustainability and research director


How do the new regulations relate to financial fair play (FFP)?

They are an evolution of FFP. Regulations have to be constantly adapted and monitored depending on the evolution of the market and the context in which clubs operate. But it's an important evolution, not just a cosmetic one, and an important step forward. On top of fine-tuning existing rules, we have introduced new ones – notably the squad-cost rule.

What would you say to those who feel UEFA has given up on FFP?

We certainly haven’t given up. Firstly, it’s important to recognise that the previous rules had a deep and positive impact. But, of course, they were not perfect, and it’s a natural process to adapt and improve the existing regulations. As European football’s governing body, UEFA has the duty toensure financial stability, and we will continue to do our best to enforce these new rules. It’s important to underline that they have received unanimous support across the European football community. Getting approval from so many stakeholders is a major achievement. UEFA has not drafted the rules on its own; we have done it together and in agreement with all our stakeholders.

What were the challenges of getting the whole football community behind these new rules?

It’s been a long process. A difficult one, but this is normal, because not everyone has the same interests and faces the same issues. We consistently sought to share all information, meet stakeholders regularly, listen to comments and take on feedback. With an inclusive, democratic and transparent process, you can overcome any challenges.

How are you working with clubs, national associations and leagues to aid a smooth transition?

The continuation of dialogue is key. As soon as the regulations were approved, we started to communicate bilaterally. We also organised workshops and educational forums, alongside the creation of toolkits and guidelines. We meet with clubs and associations, and we cooperate with umbrella bodies to organise joint workshops. There is an education plan in progress.

As for the rules themselves, they don’t all come into force at once but through a staggered approach. This will allow all parties to get used to them and implement them correctly.

To what extent will the regulations future-proof the long-term success of European club football?

This is our main goal. Society is only just coming out of the COVID-19 pandemic, and many clubs find themselves in turbulent waters. Guiding them towards a sustainable path will be challenging, possibly more challenging than it’s ever been.

You can have the best regulations, but if they are not enforced, and if people are not committed to them, you won’t achieve the results you want. That’s why it’s crucial that we’ve had buy-in from the beginning. We have the full support of our stakeholders, and European institutions as well.


What's the significance of having separate regulations for the women’s game?

It’s an important step forward. Women's football has developed a lot recently, and very quickly. Some criteria existed in the former club licensing regulations, but the time has come for women's football to have its own set of rules. This will provide the right regulatory framework for development. Indeed, I expect club licensing to act as an accelerator for raising standards in women’s football.

For example, higher standards of youth education, better accessibility to quality infrastructure, higher levels of coaching diplomas and increased professionalism in managing women’s football clubs are all very important elements that will push the women’s game forward and where club licensing can play an important role and make a significant contribution.

DEVELOPMENT
HATTRICK
UEFA’s HatTrick programme redistributes men’s EURO net earnings to its member associations for investment in development and infrastructure projects
SOLIDARITY PAYMENTS
Each season, UEFA allocates a percentage of income from its top club competitions for distribution among non-participating clubs
GROW
The Grow programme’s on-demand strategic skills help member associations to align football development projects with both their own priorities and UEFA’s strategic goals, ensuring a measurable return on investment
UEFA ACADEMY
The UEFA Academy runs educational and research programmes to help managers, players and specialists develop careers in a range of football-related activities. Courses include administration, communications, leadership, finance, governance and law
ASSIST
UEFA’s Assist programme shares the experience and know-how of European football with our five sister confederations – the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF (North and Central America), CONMEBOL (South America) and the OFC (New Zealand and South Pacific island nations), including their regional and member associations
Five ways we support the
game's development
HATTRICK
UEFA’s HatTrick programme redistributes men’s EURO net earnings to its member associations for investment in development and infrastructure projects
SOLIDARITY PAYMENTS
Each season, UEFA allocates a percentage of income from its top club competitions for distribution among non-participating clubs
GROW
The Grow programme’s on-demand strategic skills help member associations to align football development projects with both their own priorities and UEFA’s strategic goals, ensuring a measurable return on investment
UEFA ACADEMY
The UEFA Academy runs educational and research programmes to help managers, players and specialists develop careers in a range of football-related activities. Courses include administration, communications, leadership, finance, governance and law
ASSIST
UEFA’s Assist programme shares the experience and know-how of European football with our five sister confederations – the AFC (Asia), CAF (Africa), CONCACAF (North and Central America), CONMEBOL (South America) and the OFC (New Zealand and South Pacific island nations), including their regional and member associations

Support for every level of the game

SUSTAINABILITY

How we use football as a force for good

INTERNAL ORGANISATION
• Human Rights and Environmental Commitment

• UEFA sustainability strategy 2030, Strength through Unity

• UEFA sustainability action plan

• Carbon footprint tool

• Equal salary certification awarded to UEFA
EVENTS
• UEFA ESG (environmental, social and governance) event management system piloted at Women’s EURO 2022

• Integration of social and environmental sustainability criteria into UEFA’s bidding and club licensing requirements

• Sustainability policies implemented across all UEFA events

• Anti-discrimination observer scheme

• Circular economy guidelines
MEMBER ASSOCIATIONS
• Football social responsibility (FSR) managers and child and youth protection officers appointed by all member associations

• HatTrick development funding supported 84 sustainability projects

• First UNITY EURO Cup for refugee teams organised in collaboration with the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR

• UEFA’s working group on human and labour rights set up for 2022 FIFA World Cup
FOOTBALL ECOSYSTEM
• Respect Programme tackling online abuse launched

• Sustainable infrastructure guidelines published

• Coaches for Health campaign mobilised football community to promote improved health and well-being
PARTNERS AND SOCIETY
• UEFA initiated closer collaboration with its commercial partners

• Cooperation agreements with the UN World Tourism Organization and the UN Economic Commission for Europe

• UEFA became an inaugural member of the UN Football for the Goals initiative

• UEFA signed up to the UN Race to Zero campaign
key milestones in the first year of our sustainability strategy
INTERNAL ORGANISATION
• Human Rights and Environmental Commitment

• UEFA sustainability strategy 2030, Strength through Unity

• UEFA sustainability action plan

• Carbon footprint tool

• Equal salary certification awarded to UEFA
EVENTS
• UEFA ESG (environmental, social and governance) event management system piloted at Women’s EURO 2022

• Integration of social and environmental sustainability criteria into UEFA’s bidding and club licensing requirements

• Sustainability policies implemented across all UEFA events

• Anti-discrimination observer scheme

• Circular economy guidelines
MEMBER ASSOCIATIONS
• Football social responsibility (FSR) managers and child and youth protection officers appointed by all member associations

• HatTrick development funding supported 84 sustainability projects

• First UNITY EURO Cup for refugee teams organised in collaboration with the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR

• UEFA’s working group on human and labour rights set up for 2022 FIFA World Cup
FOOTBALL ECOSYSTEM
• Respect Programme tackling online abuse launched

• Sustainable infrastructure guidelines published

• Coaches for Health campaign mobilised football community to promote improved health and well-being
PARTNERS AND SOCIETY
• UEFA initiated closer collaboration with its commercial partners

• Cooperation agreements with the UN World Tourism Organization and the UN Economic Commission for Europe

• UEFA became an inaugural member of the UN Football for the Goals initiative

• UEFA signed up to the UN Race to Zero campaign
UEFA Annual Report 2021/22
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UEFA Annual Report 2021/22

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HEADLINE

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But I must explain to you how all this mistaken idea of denouncing pleasure and praising pain was born and I will give you a complete account of the system, and expound the actual teachings of the great explorer of the truth, the master-builder of human happiness. No one rejects, dislikes, or avoids pleasure itself, because it is pleasure, but because those who do not know how to pursue pleasure rationally encounter consequences that are extremely painful. Nor again is there anyone who loves or pursues or desires to obtain pain of itself, because it is pain, but because occasionally circumstances occur in which toil and pain can procure him some great pleasure. To take a trivial example, which of us ever undertakes laborious physical exercise, except to obtain some advantage from it? But who has any right to find fault with a man who chooses to enjoy a pleasure that has no annoying consequences, or one who avoids a pain that produces no resultant pleasure?

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Competitions

Governance

Development

Sustainability